Berlin tops investment and development outlook for 2018

Article witten by Theo Andrew for Real Estate Investment Times

Berlin has topped the table of the best European cities for real estate investment and development in 2018, according to a forecast published by Urban Land Institute and PwC.

This is the fourth year in a row the German capital has been top of the ‘Emerging City’ rankings, with its success attributed to its business expansion with its technology sector at the forefront.

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Full article here

Brexit is making Germany even more juicy for real estate investors

Article written by Jill Petzinger for Quartz Media

It appears the real estate sector is no less susceptible to Brexit jitters than the financial one. As the months drag on with no clear UK plan on how to exit the European Union in sight, real-estate investors are eyeing up more predictable, lucrative places to put their money—and stable haven Germany is proving a major draw.

A survey released this week from auditing company PwC and the Urban Land Institute found that Germany’s capital Berlin tops the charts as the most attractive European city for investment and development potential. Berlin, Frankfurt, Munich, and Hamburg grabbed places in the top six cities in the Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2018 report, which interviewed 818 people from the real-estate industry. London’s 2018 “overall prospects” are ranked 27th.

Picture from Markus Schreiber

Real estate investment in Germany in the last year came to €68 billion ($79 billion) up from €54 billion last year, and outstripping the UK’s €66 billion worth of investment in the last year.

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Link to the full article here

Brexit impacts real estate as investors favour Germany over UK

As British researchers focusing on all sectors of the UK economy continue to attempt to confirm if Brexit will have a positive or negative impact on the market as a whole, new figures suggest investment-friendly sentiment is in the early stages of turning its back on Britain. Despite record investment in London, particularly in early 2017, German real estate opportunities have eclipsed the desirability of their UK counterparts for the first time – possibly in anticipation of a wider financial shift toward the mainland following Britain’s divorce from Brussels.

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Just one week later, however, a new study from online real estate investment platform BrickVest has suggested the opposite. The online financial marketplace allows clients to invest in institutional quality real estate globally. Leveraging data from its platform and a survey of 3,500 professional real estate investors from a number of the world’s largest economies, the company has concluded that the continuing saga of Brexit is having an impact on the attractiveness of UK property. According to the analysis of BrickVest’s latest Commercial Property Investment Barometer, 33% of investors named Germany as their preferred destination.

This is the first time that Germany has been chosen as the number one region to invest in ahead of the UK, which was selected by just over a quarter of respondents, at 27%.

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Full article here (consultancy.uk)

Berlin Retains Top City Billing in Emerging Trends 2018

Berlin has been ranked the top city for investment and development for the fourth year in a row by Europe’s real estate community.

The German capital came first out of 31 cities in Emerging Trends in Real Estate Europe 2018, the annual forecast published by the Urban Land Institute and PwC. The report is based on the opinions of more than 800 property professionals.

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Equity and debt are expected to be just as plentiful in 2018, despite the threat of rising interest rates, while this year’s high levels of investment are forecast to continue.

The fact that German cities once again took four of the top 10 spots in the report’s score card of prospects ‘is no surprise’ says the report’s section discussing Markets to Watch. ‘Germany has been steady state for a long time now. With Berlin, people truly believe it’s going to become a major city’, a pan-European financier says.

Full article here

Article written by jane Roberts, in Market Watch.

German House Price on Fire!

Germany’s housing market price rises have been accelerating for several months. In a country where the housing market has historically been extraordinarily stable, this is a significant shift.

The reasons?
Strong economic growth, 1.1 million refugees, high work-related immigration, weak construction supply and low interest rates.

The German housing market was one of the few that avoided a slump in the wake of the 2008-2009 global financial crisis.

German house price changes:

In 2009, the price index fell by 1.9% y-o-y (-2.7% inflation-adjusted).
In 2010, prices bounced back, rising by 3.6% y-o-y (2.2% inflation-adjusted).
In 2011, house prices rose by 4.7% y-o-y (2.7% inflation-adjusted).
In 2012, house prices rose by 4.6% y-o-y (2.5% inflation-adjusted).
In 2013, house prices rose by 3.2% y-o-y (1.8% inflation-adjusted).
In 2014, house prices rose by 3.7% y-o-y (3.5% inflation-adjusted).
In 2015, house prices rose by 5.6% y-o-y (5.3% inflation-adjusted).


Statistics of price rise during the year Q2 2016:

In North-East Germany:

In Berlin apartment prices rose by 7.7% to a median price of €3,036 (US$ 3,301) per square metre (sq. m.). The median price of one- and two-family houses rose by 4.6% y-o-y to €2,104 (US$ 2,287) per sq. m.

Hanover had the strongest y-o-y apartment price hike in Q2 2016, rising by 10.02% to €2,172 (US$ 2,361) per sq. m. However, one- and two-family houses increased by only 1.33% to €1,719 (US$ 1,869) per sq. m.

In Dresden, median apartment prices rose by 1.79% to €1,987 (US$ 2,160) per sq. m., while one- and two-family houses increased by 6.35% to €1,995 (US$ 2,169) per sq. m.

In Hamburg, median apartment prices increased by only 1.41% to €3,480 (US$ 3,783) per sq. m. One- and two-family houses rose by 2.57% to €2,325 (US$ 2,528) per sq. m..

In West Germany:

Dusseldorf had the highest apartment price increase in the region, rising by 7.62% to a median price of €2,261 (US$ 2,458) per sq. m. In contrast, the median price of one- and two-family houses fell by 1.57% to €2,163 (US$ 2,352) per sq. m.

In Cologne, median apartment prices rose by 5.79% to €2,474 (US$ 2,690) per sq. m. One- and two-family houses had a price increase of 1.92% y-o-y to €2,099 (US$ 2,282) per sq. m.

In Dortmund, median apartment prise fell by 3.05% to €1,300 (US$ 1,413) per sq. m. Prices of one- and two-family houses also fell by 1.06% to €1,872 (US$ 2,035) per sq. m.

In South Germany:

Frankfurt had the weakest y-o-y apartment price hike in South Germany, increasing by 3.29% to €2,600 (US$ 2,827) per sq. m. The same is true for its one- and two-family houses, which rose by only 1.44% to €2,219 (US$ 2,413) per sq. m.

Apartments in Munich enjoy the highest y-o-y price hike in the region, increasing by 10.52% to €4,821 (US$ 5,241) per sq. m. One- and two-family houses had a price increase of 5.75% to €3,627 (US$ 3,943) per sq. m.

In Stuttgart, apartment prices rose by 9.07% to a median price of €2,519 (US$ 2,739) per sq. m., while the median price of one- and two-family houses rose by 8.29% to €2,525 (US$ 2,745) per sq. m.

Berlin’s still cheap, but….

Berlin’s rising rents and overstretched supply of living units is a problem that’s not going to go away on its own. While rents in the German capital are still comparatively cheaper to rates one would find in London, Paris or major US cities, Berliners also generally earn less than their counterparts in other world metropolises.
But Berlin is playing catch-up with its global peers –and the current tightness on the rental market is just a symptom of that.
“Since reunification in 1990, and structural problems have existed for a long time, and now the city is transforming into a world-class city,”

The Facts and Figures that Support Charlottenburg’s Investment Case

(Part Two of Two)

In Part Two of our introduction (Part One here), we reveal who lives in the area and the numbers behind the investment case that highlight why this City-West location is so appealing to real estate investors.

Home to Wealthy Berliners, Creative Students and Young Families

Charlottenburg has always attracted Berlin’s wealthiest and chicest residents, ever since Sophie Charlotte commissioned the stunning Schloss Charlottenburg. Today, the district counts politicians and local celebrities among its affluent residents. The area has previously been likened to London’s Fitzrovia.

Charlottenburg’s high-end villas and spacious apartments are typically larger than the average in Berlin, with many featuring balconies, garden access and cellar space as well. Wide roads and pavements, elegant avenues lined with trees and classic 19th century architecture make this an attractive and refined neighborhood.

Yet, despite constant development in this busy city centre district, Charlottenburg still offers quiet corners of oasis and pockets of greenery, including playgrounds which attract many middle-class families to the area. To the east, Charlottenburg borders Tiergarten Park, a vast expanse of lakes and woodland in the heart of Berlin, comparable to London’s Hyde Park.

Charlottenburg is also an easy commute to the CBD and other prominent employment areas. The Strasse des 17. Juni runs eastwards from Charlottenburg Gate, through Tiergarten Park, to the famous Brandenburg Gate – connecting Charlottenburg with Berlin-Mitte (Central Berlin) in just a 10-minute drive. What’s more, the prime central location of Charlottenburg as an inner-city district inside the S-Bahn ring (train network) means this area is unrivalled in location as well as class.

In addition, Charlottenburg boasts a large student population due to two local universities: the Technical University of Berlin and the Berlin University of the Arts. Combined, they have a population of over 30,000 students.

Facts and Figures: Charlottenburg as an Investment

Charlottenburg is one Berlin’s best-performing property markets. A traditional, mature and middle-class neighbourhood, rather than an ‘up and coming’ district, Charlottenburg is an evergreen location for property investment in Berlin. Every property in the entire district is considered to have a sophisticated, premium and much sought-after address.

As of the end of 2015, Charlottenburg was reported to have a population of over 330,000 (CBRE). A strong continued pattern of population and price means there is a predicted population growth forecast of 6.1% before 2025.

Therefore, it’s no surprise that demand far outstrips supply and value is rare. Land for new builds is scarce in City West locations such as Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf. As of January 2017, there were 460 apartments, either under construction or planned, per 100,000 residents – well below Berlin’s average of 890 per 100,000 residents (CBRE).

Exploring Charlottenburg: a mix of old and new in central Berlin

(Part One of Two)

The traditional neighbourhood of Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf, named after historic aristocrat Sophie Charlotte of Hanover, Queen consort of Prussia, has long been an area associated with affluence and culture. Ever improving, this district is known for its brilliant mix of old and new, with many residents choosing to live in the area because of the unique combination of rich history and comfortable modernity.

A Long History of Affluence, Culture and Commercial Value

An independent city until 1920, Charlottenburg was then incorporated into Greater Berlin and became known as the ‘New West’ during an era known as ‘The Golden 20s’. At this time, the many theatres, cinemas, bars and restaurants which populated the district gave Charlottenburg the title of Berlin’s leisure and nightlife capital.

This reputation ended with the rise of the Nazi party and the area was heavily damaged in World War II, by both air raids and the Battle of Berlin. However, after 1945, the area quickly regained its influence by becoming the commercial city centre of newly-divided West Berlin.

Charlottenburg Today: A Luxury Retail Destination and Upmarket Residential District

Post-reunification, Charlottenburg is still known as one of the most upmarket areas of the city, with high-end bars and restaurants attracting a bourgeoisie crowd of wealthy residents and visitors.

A shopper’s paradise, Charlottenburg’s famous Kurfürstendamm (often abbreviated to Ku’damm) has been likened to London’s Bond Street and Paris’ Champs-Élysées; the Ku’damm shopping boulevard is packed with designer flagship stores and boutiques, while KaDeWe is the largest department store in Europe.

Aside from being Berlin’s biggest retail destination, Charlottenburg has preserved its historic status as a diverse cultural hub. The area is home to a range of museums, hotels and theatres; an Olympic Stadium from the controversial 1936 Olympic Games; an opera house; Germany’s oldest mosque still in use; and West Berlin’s Chinatown on Kantstrasse, dubbed ‘Kantonstrasses’ after the Canton area of South China.

Of course, Charlottenburg’s most iconic landmark is the picturesque Schloss Charlottenburg (Charlottenburg Palace, pictured above), which is the largest surviving royal palace in Berlin.

A Popular, Established Neighbourhood with a Bright Future

The ruins of Charlottenburg’s Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church date back to the 1890s, but today they stand alongside towering hotels and contemporary office blocks on the Ku’damm. This mix of old and new best defines the character of Charlottenburg and ultimately, Berlin’s ongoing transition from a city divided to a global-minded metropolis that is looking to the future.

Berlin landlords can attract the successful millennial renter with high quality furnished apartments

• As the millennial rental demographic booms, furnished apartments on short term contracts become highly sought after

• Millennials have high expectations of quality and comfort, as well as convenient city-centre locations

• Buy Berlin announces partnership with furnishing experts David Phillips to help Berlin property investors prepare their apartments to a high spec in order to attract short-term, high quality tenants

• David Phillips, based in the UK, is bringing its successful furnishing business model to the Berlin property market for the first time

Buy Berlin, a Berlin-focused real estate agency that offers a complete and personal service to its international and domestic client base, announced its partnership with furnishing experts David Phillips today.

Buy Berlin has long recognised the changing requirements of the Berlin market, with increasing numbers of millennial workers looking for good quality, short term furnished apartments to suit their lifestyle and expectations.

Darrell Smith, Buy Berlin’s CEO who has operated in the Berlin market for over ten years says, “Berlin, like Germany as a whole, has traditionally offered long term rental agreements which, of course, have their benefits in terms of stability. However, this can inhibit the ability for young workers to easily move when their work and social needs change. We developed our Corporate Furnished Service as a way to provide the right accommodation for this demographic and to encourage more landlords to convert their apartments into millennial-friendly homes whilst securing the best rental value they can.”

The furnishing service is unique in Berlin, with the Buy Berlin / David Phillips partnership being the first of its kind in Germany.

Nick Gill, CEO of David Phillips, says “There is no comparable option available in Germany right now, and we are excited and proud to be partnering with Buy Berlin to deliver a service that is badly needed and long overdue in Europe’s most dynamic and evolving property market. Buy Berlin is a visionary and interruptive company in their field, open to innovation and new ideas, so the partnership is a perfect fit.”

The world continues to evolve rapidly. Many of us have quickly become accustomed to instant news, last minute travel and having everything available at the push of an app.

Moreover, whether we are a landlord or tenant, we are looking for convenience, flexibility and quality when it comes to our choices.

Smith continues, “Partnering with David Phillips means it is now easier than ever for Buy Berlin’s property investors to purchase the right kind of furniture for the Berlin rental market and to secure the best rental value in an increasingly competitive market. We can now offer landlords a unique service in Berlin, supplying high quality furniture packages quickly and installed without fuss.”

It may be a boutique real estate agency compared to some of Germany’s big hitters, but a straightforward service is what has set Buy Berlin apart.

Smith concludes, “We are committed to continually working on behalf of our clients to make property investment as easy and as successful as possible, and this extends to understanding what the best Berlin tenants want. This service sits alongside, and enhances, our entire suite of real estate services and we look forward to both landlords and tenants benefiting from David Phillips’ exceptional furnishing services.”

Investment in Berlin startups jumped by €1 billion this year, study shows

Venture capital investments in German startups hit a record level in the first half of 2017, with Berlin seeing a huge rise in funding for its startup scene, a new report shows.
Funding rounds for startups in Germany and the overall value of funding hit record levels in the first six months of this year, a report released this month by professional services firm EY reveals.

Investment Capital Berlin - Source: EY

The total number of investments in German startups rose by 6 percent in comparison with the same period in 2016, to 264.

But the really explosive growth was seen in the overall size of investment. In the first half of this year, €2.163 billion of investors’ money went into startups, an increase of roughly €1.2 billion in comparison with the first half of 2016.

That growth was mainly driven by the e-commerce sector. At €939 million, over 40 percent of overall funding went into e-commerce. But health, FinTech and software startups all saw significant investment growth.

Link to article

Berlin’s not perfect, but Samsung is right: it’s more fun than London

Felix Petersen, managing director of Samsung Next Europe, reportedly says that his company will not set up its headquarters in London. It’s just “not a fun place to live unless you are really rich”, is the rationale. Instead, Petersen and colleagues will set up shop in Berlin, hoping to find a home that is both far more enjoyable and affordable.

Club in Berlin - Photograph: Christian Jungeblodt for the Guardian

As a Berliner, I can give Petersen some idea of what he can expect.

Certainly, there are things to say about London, where I lived for 14 years before moving to Berlin. The last time I was there, very recently, a signal failure saw the cancellation of all trains between Paddington and Slough in the very middle of rush hour. No rail replacement bus services were arranged: people were simply expected to trek home with the aid of suddenly exorbitant taxi fares. For one of the most expensive transport systems in the world, there didn’t seem to be much bang for your buck. It seemed to be a fitting metaphor for a town apparently desperate to become Geneva-on-Thames.

One can see why Petersen’s eye might settle on Berlin, for it has long been seen as a mecca for tech startups, with its lower costs allowing them to recruit and retain young talent. Samsung’s arrival may mark a greater maturity of that market, allowing younger companies to rebase in a capital more easily accessible than London or San Francisco.

Petersen and colleagues will find much to love in Berlin. There are parks, lakes and forests within a short train ride, nightclubs on which the sun never sets. There are theatres, food markets, streets of endless bars.

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Link to the article